What we do

In Symplexis, our ultimate goal is to make the lives of people a step closer to what they deserve by helping them overcome difficult situations and challenges affecting directly their lives. Therefore, our activities are designed and put to practice having the beneficiaries in their center, together with a set of values as cornerstone, like impact sustainability, respect to uniqueness and tailor-made approach, user-driven design and implementation, results-based orientation and superior community ideals. These values are our main crosscutting priorities to each and every activity we undertake.

Our work focuses on a wide range of fields of specialization, alla related with elevating social cohesion and serving the modern needs of populations at risk of social exclusion.

Inclusion into the labour market is one of the main vehicles for promoting social inclusion and avoiding marginalization. Therefore, we are trying to design and implement integrated and sustainable programmes so that specific populations either in the edge or outside the labour market can (re)gain access to it. Such programmes require a beneficiary-driven approach, taking into account the many special characteristics and needs of different vulnerable target groups, such as long-term unemployed, young persons with low typical skills, third country nationals, single-parented families, Roma populations, persons with disabilities etc.

Our belief and approach is that these specific characteristics of each target group, if properly used and utilized, can be turned from disadvantages to competitive advantages, facilitating the entrance in the labour market both in a fulfilling way for the beneficiaries, but also adding value to the labour market and local economy itself.

Inclusion into the labour market is one of the main vehicles for promoting social inclusion and avoiding marginalization. Therefore, we are trying to design and implement integrated and sustainable programmes so that specific populations either in the edge or outside the labour market can (re)gain access to it. Such programmes require a beneficiary-driven approach, taking into account the many special characteristics and needs of different vulnerable target groups, such as long-term unemployed, young persons with low typical skills, third country nationals, single-parented families, Roma populations, persons with disabilities etc.

Our belief and approach is that these specific characteristics of each target group, if properly used and utilized, can be turned from disadvantages to competitive advantages, facilitating the entrance in the labour market both in a fulfilling way for the beneficiaries, but also adding value to the labour market and local economy itself.

We are actively engaged into contributing towards a society without any discrimination element due to gender or sexual identity. Even though gender-based challenges have shifted from promoting equal opportunities between men and women more towards protecting the rights and promoting equal treatment of specific “gender-driven” vulnerable populations (i.e. LGBT community), there is still a long way for achieving equal opportunities for all. Combatting relevant stereotypes, alleviating gender-based discrimination and cultivating a feeling of respect and acceptance of diversity are of paramount importance for us and constitute the specific objectives of our relevant interventions.

We are trying to work in this field not only by supporting populations directly affected and being victims of gender-based discrimination, but also by sensitising other target groups and raising awareness, promoting proactivity and cultivating a sense of respect, which is a far more efficient solution to this problem.

We are actively engaged into contributing towards a society without any discrimination element due to gender or sexual identity. Even though gender-based challenges have shifted from promoting equal opportunities between men and women more towards protecting the rights and promoting equal treatment of specific “gender-driven” vulnerable populations (i.e. LGBT community), there is still a long way for achieving equal opportunities for all. Combatting relevant stereotypes, alleviating gender-based discrimination and cultivating a feeling of respect and acceptance of diversity are of paramount importance for us and constitute the specific objectives of our relevant interventions.

We are trying to work in this field not only by supporting populations directly affected and being victims of gender-based discrimination, but also by sensitising other target groups and raising awareness, promoting proactivity and cultivating a sense of respect, which is a far more efficient solution to this problem.

Besides the labour market, education and lifelong learning is an additional vehicle of paramount importance for promoting social inclusion and avoiding marginalization. For us, there are 2 relevant challenges, equally important: an inclusive formal education system, able to maintain disadvantaged pupils inside classrooms (mainly for the youth) and enriching knowledge background and also skills lifelong learning programmes and non-formal education (for everybody). Therefore, we put emphasis both in supporting the formal education system and widening its access to all and also to designing and delivering customized lifelong learning, education and capacity building opportunities especially for populations with an underprivileged educational background.

Our ultimate goal is to contribute to developing all necessary skills and competences so that vulnerable populations have equal employability opportunities. For this purpose, we are utilizing innovative techniques and methodologies, including not only conventional capacity building activities (workshops, training programmes, etc.) but also ICT solutions (like mobile applications and games) and mobility programmes, aiming at increasing the efficiency and end result of our interventions.

Besides the labour market, education and lifelong learning is an additional vehicle of paramount importance for promoting social inclusion and avoiding marginalization. For us, there are 2 relevant challenges, equally important: an inclusive formal education system, able to maintain disadvantaged pupils inside classrooms (mainly for the youth) and enriching knowledge background and also skills lifelong learning programmes and non-formal education (for everybody). Therefore, we put emphasis both in supporting the formal education system and widening its access to all and also to designing and delivering customized lifelong learning, education and capacity building opportunities especially for populations with an underprivileged educational background.

Our ultimate goal is to contribute to developing all necessary skills and competences so that vulnerable populations have equal employability opportunities. For this purpose, we are utilizing innovative techniques and methodologies, including not only conventional capacity building activities (workshops, training programmes, etc.) but also ICT solutions (like mobile applications and games) and mobility programmes, aiming at increasing the efficiency and end result of our interventions.

Even before the recent migration flows, modern developed societies and communities were characterized by a rich multicultural and multiethnic element, since most European countries and especially EU members have been hosting third country nationals for many years. Our mentality is totally aligned with EU values and human-rights approach, dictating that cultural and ethnic diversity is a driver for development and progress, not a factor hindering social cohesion and leading to discriminatory behaviours. Consequently, we are trying to utilize the human capital of third country nationals for empowering their recipient communities.

Our main focus in twofold: on the one hand to support third country nationals (migrants, refugees, asylum seekers) blend in their host communities, while on the other hand to help recipient communities and native populations to accept third country nationals and to avoid discriminatory behaviours. For accomplishing these objectives, we follow an integrated approach, trying to involve all stakeholders and making use of alternative means promoting the acceptance of third country nationals and their integration, like awareness raising campaigns, introduction programmes of third country nationals to all aspects of their new community (educational system, labour market etc.), networking and developing relationships between third country nationals and native populations, combatting radicalization and racism phenomena etc.

Even before the recent migration flows, modern developed societies and communities were characterized by a rich multicultural and multiethnic element, since most European countries and especially EU members have been hosting third country nationals for many years. Our mentality is totally aligned with EU values and human-rights approach, dictating that cultural and ethnic diversity is a driver for development and progress, not a factor hindering social cohesion and leading to discriminatory behaviours. Consequently, we are trying to utilize the human capital of third country nationals for empowering their recipient communities.

Our main focus in twofold: on the one hand to support third country nationals (migrants, refugees, asylum seekers) blend in their host communities, while on the other hand to help recipient communities and native populations to accept third country nationals and to avoid discriminatory behaviours. For accomplishing these objectives, we follow an integrated approach, trying to involve all stakeholders and making use of alternative means promoting the acceptance of third country nationals and their integration, like awareness raising campaigns, introduction programmes of third country nationals to all aspects of their new community (educational system, labour market etc.), networking and developing relationships between third country nationals and native populations, combatting radicalization and racism phenomena etc.